asker

Anonymous asked: As you are the only one I know who loves both DA and TW, I'm venting for you: how about a DA!AU, where Scott, Stiles and Lydia are mages, Derek is a Grey Warden, and Scott somehow gets infected by the taint, and Stiles and him end up running away to find Grey Wardens to save Scott. The Argents are totally Templars. Jackson is some noble or something. Lydia ran off from the circle earlier, and ended up marrying him, cut she DGAF.

i wish i had my quickcam on so i could have captured the progression of faces i made as i read this ask. alas i am failure, so you will have to trust me when i say holy fucking shit i want this

and jesus christ the argents as templars how ridiculously perfect omg. it’s almost a direct parallel, their moderate sect in violent clash with the fanatics, right down to my own moral question of whether the existence of them is necessary re: human autonomy vs legitimate public safety issues

but if they’re templars, would stiles be a mage? i think scott would make an amazing mage, and stiles his apostate-abetting best friend. scott didn’t really show his talents until recently, and when he did stiles threw himself into research to keep scott safe, right? and then the fifth blight begins and ends and during the sieges scott contracts the taint and has to seek out the wardens.

and they find derek, a mage warden whose regiment was slaughtered, not by darkspawn but by another warden, and now he’s on his own and vulnerable to both monsters and the reach of the chantry. (he’s been a free mage all his life, part of the wardens since his apostate family was killed by a templar cough cough and he and laura had to seek out sanctuary, but that’s ancient history)

but scott is dying, and derek will help scott if he agrees to help derek track down who killed his sister-commander and team. but since stiles will know the secrets of the wardens, both of them have to join or derek will be forced to kill stiles

neither of them hesitates, i mean being a warden is a pass to use magic freely and not be forced into a circle, but they don’t really realize just how closely the templars are watching. derek does.

so they’re laying low in denerim, derek gathering info and stiles splitting his time between scott and learning this whole warden thing (ie spending increasingly more time around the only experienced if incredibly grumpy warden he knows), while scott uses his newly-free magic for do-gooding and meets this amazing girl…

man i could go on and on and on for hours jesus christ

grand cleric victoria JUST PICTURE IT

merryrobot:

ademska:

dragonageconfessions:

Confession: The more I think about it, the more disappointed I get with how little The Warden is developed in game.  A lot of the character development tends to be in the players head or in fanfiction.  It’s kind of sad, because I can see a whole lot of potential.

GEE, it’s like the warden isn’t actually a character and is meant to be an imprintable player avatar! except since it’s a videogame, a visual medium instead of a majority imaginative one, that’s not a very effective design scheme!!
whoda thunk 

iiiiidk man i gotta respectfully disagree here
player avatar characters in video games have a long, storied history, especially when it comes to wrpgs which further have their roots in pen-and-paper games which were hugely based on imagination and creativity and arguing that video games are uniquely unsuited to this concept seems…idk a little shortsighted? the issue here isn’t visuals, it’s interactivity, meaning that if any storytelling medium is fit for a player avatar character video games is it.
i mean that doesn’t mean it has to appeal to you but just because it isn’t your cuppa doesn’t mean it’s bad game design? or at least you can’t really call it such without sending p much the entire wrpg genre under the bus with it

that’s coo’
the issue i take with dao in particular is its jarring divide between what it seeks to be: a videogame equivalent of pen-and-paper rpgs where almost anything is possible, and what it actually is: deeply constrained by programming confines and the contrast between a visually rich cast and flat player avatar. that doesn’t necessitate throwing every game predecessor to it under the bus, though
dragon age is a graphically-advanced, visually realistic game. characters have extensive body language and engaging acting, while the warden neither moves nor talks, so watching the cast doesn’t require any kind of imaginative stretching, but the second the camera jumps back to the warden, the player is required to bear the burden of imagining interaction. this wasn’t really an issue ten years ago during the formative crpg era, because games as a whole required a lot more imagination on the part of the player
maybe dao isn’t jarring for a good chunk of players, but there’s a reason bioware’s completely abandoned that model. it’s unsustainable with today’s game technology tbh

merryrobot:

ademska:

dragonageconfessions:

Confession: The more I think about it, the more disappointed I get with how little The Warden is developed in game.  A lot of the character development tends to be in the players head or in fanfiction.  It’s kind of sad, because I can see a whole lot of potential.

GEE, it’s like the warden isn’t actually a character and is meant to be an imprintable player avatar! except since it’s a videogame, a visual medium instead of a majority imaginative one, that’s not a very effective design scheme!!

whoda thunk

iiiiidk man i gotta respectfully disagree here

player avatar characters in video games have a long, storied history, especially when it comes to wrpgs which further have their roots in pen-and-paper games which were hugely based on imagination and creativity and arguing that video games are uniquely unsuited to this concept seems…idk a little shortsighted? the issue here isn’t visuals, it’s interactivity, meaning that if any storytelling medium is fit for a player avatar character video games is it.

i mean that doesn’t mean it has to appeal to you but just because it isn’t your cuppa doesn’t mean it’s bad game design? or at least you can’t really call it such without sending p much the entire wrpg genre under the bus with it

that’s coo’

the issue i take with dao in particular is its jarring divide between what it seeks to be: a videogame equivalent of pen-and-paper rpgs where almost anything is possible, and what it actually is: deeply constrained by programming confines and the contrast between a visually rich cast and flat player avatar. that doesn’t necessitate throwing every game predecessor to it under the bus, though

dragon age is a graphically-advanced, visually realistic game. characters have extensive body language and engaging acting, while the warden neither moves nor talks, so watching the cast doesn’t require any kind of imaginative stretching, but the second the camera jumps back to the warden, the player is required to bear the burden of imagining interaction. this wasn’t really an issue ten years ago during the formative crpg era, because games as a whole required a lot more imagination on the part of the player

maybe dao isn’t jarring for a good chunk of players, but there’s a reason bioware’s completely abandoned that model. it’s unsustainable with today’s game technology tbh

(via merryspectre)

dragonageconfessions:

Confession: The more I think about it, the more disappointed I get with how little The Warden is developed in game.  A lot of the character development tends to be in the players head or in fanfiction.  It’s kind of sad, because I can see a whole lot of potential.

GEE, it’s like the warden isn’t actually a character and is meant to be an imprintable player avatar! except since it’s a videogame, a visual medium instead of a majority imaginative one, that’s not a very effective design scheme!!
whoda thunk

dragonageconfessions:

Confession: The more I think about it, the more disappointed I get with how little The Warden is developed in game.  A lot of the character development tends to be in the players head or in fanfiction.  It’s kind of sad, because I can see a whole lot of potential.

GEE, it’s like the warden isn’t actually a character and is meant to be an imprintable player avatar! except since it’s a videogame, a visual medium instead of a majority imaginative one, that’s not a very effective design scheme!!

whoda thunk

missl0nelyhearts:

okay maybe i’m a little disappointed…

Read More

maybe this is wishful thinking on my part, but right now i’m putting this down to comic art failings

every other single comic we’ve had in dragon age (or mass effect HA HA wait that’s a lie they never focus on women) fandom has reduced the figures of its women down to more traditional comic book proportions. isabela stayed busty, but she lost her thickness and muscle bulk completely in favor of slim tone

hopefully that’s what we’re seeing here, because while the original concept art had a pretty big disparity too, it’s wasn’t nearly as hilarious dcau superman-vs-wonderwoman as this

upsettingshorts:

Ask those citizens how they feel after what happened in Act 3.

didn’t we get confirmation that kirkwall basically enters a civil war? i know aveline with a romanced donnic confirms that a good portion of citizens blame meredith just as much or more than anders for the chaos that follows the chantry explosion
which makes sense, considering that in act 3 tensions has escalated so much that people were taking sides in equal measure, even if the pro-mage stuff is partly from an equality perspective and partly from a hey-give-us-back-our-OWN-civil-liberties-you-crazy-bitch place

upsettingshorts:

Ask those citizens how they feel after what happened in Act 3.

didn’t we get confirmation that kirkwall basically enters a civil war? i know aveline with a romanced donnic confirms that a good portion of citizens blame meredith just as much or more than anders for the chaos that follows the chantry explosion

which makes sense, considering that in act 3 tensions has escalated so much that people were taking sides in equal measure, even if the pro-mage stuff is partly from an equality perspective and partly from a hey-give-us-back-our-OWN-civil-liberties-you-crazy-bitch place

okay but here’s the thing about critiquing other people’s ships tho

like, as a matter of just ‘your ship is dumb and sucks and you’re dumb for shipping it abloobloo’, like no question, that’s really stupid and you’re kind of shitty for being that way

but if you want to analyze the narrative pacing or thematic merits of a certain relationship within a canon versus another, we shouldn’t necessarily frown on it or dismiss it under a blanket of nah-nah-nah-boo-boo ur ship sux mine is best

there are a lot of popular pairings that from a writing perspective i find superior to other, equally popular pairings. it’s not a matter of me finding the people who enjoy it lesser in any capacity, or even that i’m questioning the validity of the pairing (or subsequent ship) on its face, but rather just a judgment of how i’ve interpreted the story and what best fits inside

probably the best example for my followers is hawke/anders vs hawke/fenris or isabela. da2’s story is a deconstruction: the breakdown in act 3 where the tale would normally end at act 2. as hawke’s life and everything around him deteriorate, i find it more relevant for his lover to fall with him, to be the heaviest weight to drag him down. the romance parallels the narrative, where those two characters’ do not.

uhhhhh mass effect example i guess: a shepard (of either gender, but admittedly portrayed most often in fanworks as male) who hooks up with kaidan in me3 versus me1 follows, imo, a more satisfactory pacing structure. their relationship (regardless of romance) goes through a lot more rises and falls than is typical in a medium by necessity of being in a trilogy, but the bumps are much less noticeable when there is no romance, because it is overshadowed by the rising action that is their unresolved tension.

and all that? is just my own opinion based on my own interpretation. it’s just preferential analysis, and it doesn’t intend to diminish any ships, because ships aren’t pairings, ships are opinions on a pairing.

as long as we respect everyone’s opinions, we shouldn’t shy away from this kind of discussion

hell, it helps us better understand why we love what we love

if i ever hear anyone who enjoys mass effect 1 complain about ‘reused levels’ in dragon age 2 again

i will drive to their house and shit in their mouths

wow idk who my special question anon is but i love you so much :>
genre in this sense is i think a bit badly-defined. from my 15 (oh my god) or so years of reading fanfic, all things being equal, it seems like there’s a cultural understanding that, say, ‘fluff’ is an indicator that a given fic is happy and free of what troubles lie elsewhere in the source.
and i don’t like that.
idk, i’m always kinda of the opinion that fanfiction, like a truly good piece, should run narratively parallel to or be in some sense a microcosm of its source.
say you write a fic of, idk, hawke and tragic love interest going kitten shopping. it’s cute, solid prose, maybe you’ve even got the voices down. that’s good exercise, sure, but what gives it merit? what elevates it from words and actions with familiar backdrops and familiar names to hawke and tragic love interest go kitten shopping, and everything that entails? i’m not saying every da2 fanfic ever has to end with a knife in the back or two wounded people running from a burning city, but what have you given us that remembers that that knife, be it stayed or bloody, is part of their reality? what do you have that remembers and respects the journey they take?
the same goes for angst or any other ‘genre’ of fanfic. you’ve got the sad bits, right, but what of the bits that aren’t sad, the bits that are just as important to the story?
it’s like, you bake a pie, and you want me to taste that pie, you cut a slice of it, but all the slice has is apples. it’s a slice, sure, but it’s not representative of the whole pie, and those apples may be fine on their own but we’re missing out on everything that pie is.
the other day i said something about ‘fucking refusing to write straight-up fluff’ for hawke/anders, and this is what i was getting at. okay, they have their happy moments, they have their heartbreaking moments, they have their passionate and pained moments, and all that together is what makes them them in the first place.
the easiest way to answer your question is to say that i love anything that takes the heart of its source, reduces it to its most basic level, a distilled idea, and never forgets that idea.
…failing that, i don’t like slavefic.

wow idk who my special question anon is but i love you so much :>

genre in this sense is i think a bit badly-defined. from my 15 (oh my god) or so years of reading fanfic, all things being equal, it seems like there’s a cultural understanding that, say, ‘fluff’ is an indicator that a given fic is happy and free of what troubles lie elsewhere in the source.

and i don’t like that.

idk, i’m always kinda of the opinion that fanfiction, like a truly good piece, should run narratively parallel to or be in some sense a microcosm of its source.

say you write a fic of, idk, hawke and tragic love interest going kitten shopping. it’s cute, solid prose, maybe you’ve even got the voices down. that’s good exercise, sure, but what gives it merit? what elevates it from words and actions with familiar backdrops and familiar names to hawke and tragic love interest go kitten shopping, and everything that entails? i’m not saying every da2 fanfic ever has to end with a knife in the back or two wounded people running from a burning city, but what have you given us that remembers that that knife, be it stayed or bloody, is part of their reality? what do you have that remembers and respects the journey they take?

the same goes for angst or any other ‘genre’ of fanfic. you’ve got the sad bits, right, but what of the bits that aren’t sad, the bits that are just as important to the story?

it’s like, you bake a pie, and you want me to taste that pie, you cut a slice of it, but all the slice has is apples. it’s a slice, sure, but it’s not representative of the whole pie, and those apples may be fine on their own but we’re missing out on everything that pie is.

the other day i said something about ‘fucking refusing to write straight-up fluff’ for hawke/anders, and this is what i was getting at. okay, they have their happy moments, they have their heartbreaking moments, they have their passionate and pained moments, and all that together is what makes them them in the first place.

the easiest way to answer your question is to say that i love anything that takes the heart of its source, reduces it to its most basic level, a distilled idea, and never forgets that idea.

…failing that, i don’t like slavefic.

asker

Anonymous asked: What do you think Cassandra's role will be in DAIII?

honestly, until i watch dawn of the seeker, that’s a difficult question to answer and pretty much pure (if educated) speculation.

what mike laidlaw and david gaider i think definitely understand at this point is that the series lacks a neutral or even moderate major perspective. every world-informing character is in some way biased, as is yknow the nature of an oppressor-oppressed system. the warden and hawke fit this, at least to some degree, but they are player characters who inherently neither inform nor shape the world. elthina posited herself as a neutral party, but as we all know, inaction from a member of an oppressive regime is still totally taking sides.

given what we’ve seen from cassandra so far—specifically, her journey from uninformed to informed—and her unique role as a sort of internal affairs agent for the main problematic political group, it seems like they’re grooming her to fill in that void. seekers have so far shown themselves to be corruptible by the chantry, sure, but cassandra specifically shows traits of real understanding of da2’s events. as she gains knowledge, she recants her accusations and slowly turns to neutrality.

and honestly, from a narrative perspective, if we’re to have a subjective protagonist (ie create-able character) again, having cassandra as a squadmate doesn’t actually make a lot of sense. she’s a true neutral party, and the entire point of modern bioware titles is taking sides. characters in your squad are supposed to supplement and react to player decisions, and the way cassandra looks to be playing out, she would be inadequate in that role.

…unless, of course, our character is also a chantry seeker or some similar investigative agent.

which mannnnnnnn that would be so cool